Guide

Glaze Painting Techniques

The glaze used in painting is a clear liquid that is mixed with opaque paint to create unique finishes on walls, cabinets, and furniture. This type of faux painting is to create effects like old antiques or worn crackling with the help of special Painting Kits that are designed for this purpose only. The glaze comes in latex and alkyd-based forms that dry slowly in order to develop quality finishes. Glaze application is either by applying it to surfaces or wiping it off and sometimes a combination of methods.

  1. Latex glaze should be mixed with latex paint. Alkyd glaze should be mixed with alkyd paints.
  1. As a basic rule for mixing paint with glaze, use 1 part paint and 4 parts glaze. Variations of this formula depending on the look you are trying to create.

Applications:

  1. Sponging- lightly dip a sponge into the glaze-paint mixture then stamp it onto surfaces. Different raised textures depend on the amount of glaze used. Using a few colors adds depth to the effect.
  1. Streaking- use a putty knife or other various edged tools to apply the glaze. The effect looks like random streaks by spreading different amounts of glaze in desired directions.
  1. Rolling- paint rollers come in many sizes and textures that allow for the glaze to be applied with specific grains. This is the fastest way to paint large areas.
  1. Brushing- use a paintbrush and unevenly brush on the glaze. This can create a rustic look with dimension by adding multiple layers of glaze.
  1. Wiping- apply glaze to the surface then use an old rag to manipulate the glaze. You can smear or lightly wipe away the glaze. To age, a surface, wipe the glaze so it is lighter in the flat areas and allow the corners and cracked areas to be dark.
  1. Distressing- apply glaze to the surface and use a dry brush to make crosshatches. Use small and quick brush strokes. Vary the direction of the strokes randomly.

  1. Crackling- a special type of glaze, Crackle Glaze, is readily available to create a crackled look. Effective application for this effect requires 3 steps done incorrect order.
  • First, paint the surface with one color. Only use paint. Do not add glaze yet. Then let it dry fully.
  • Second, apply the clear colorless crackle glaze on top of the first layer of paint.
  • Third, then apply another layer of paint in any color different from the first layer of paint. The paint automatically cracks as a chemical reaction to the layer of glaze. The crackled paint allows the bottom layer of paint to become visible. The end result is cracks, buckling, and lines of paint in various directions and colors.

Tips:

  • Buy all of the paint you need at once to prevent getting the wrong colored paint if you run out. Custom mixing is hard to replicate again.
  • Use lighter colors in small rooms. When choosing paint colors, a color with its lighter and darker shades all work well with each other. Paint stores also provide complimentary color cards for convenience.
  • Think twice about the dark color you want. Dark colors are very difficult to cover up, not to mention costly.
  • Test the color on the surface you want to paint before full application to see if it is the color and shade you want. Most stores allow returns on paint. You can sometimes buy returned paint for cheaper.
  • Keep the glaze relatively thin or else it will become goopy and unworkable.
  • Don’t be afraid to make a mistake in the application. Mistakes can turn out to be the best-looking piece.
  • Think about adding a top layer of polyurethane gloss to seal in the new effects.
  • Painting is a messy job. Use tarps to protect furniture and floors. You might want to consider wearing gloves and old clothes. A facemask might be necessary if you cannot tolerate the smell.
  • Only use oil-based paints if you have time to allot for slow drying and clean up. You will need oil paint remover to clean brushes and containers.
  • You get what you pay for in paint quality. The most expensive paint is not necessary but it has better coverage and consistency compared to cheaper paints.
  • Consult your nearest hardwood stores for more techniques.

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